Nova Scotia Researchers Recommend a Go-Slow Approach on Fracking

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Nova Scotia Researchers Recommend a Go-Slow Approach on FrackingA new study researching on the effect of fracking on human health in Nova Scotia has advised the provincial authorities to tread slowly on the oil and gas extracting technology.

The report, which was drafted by Nova Scotia’s deputy chief medical officer Frank Atherton, found out that it will take effort, investment and time to build the protective measures, reported the Guardian.

“As others have noted, the (oil and gas) resources have been in place for millennia and are not going to disappear any time soon,” says Frank Atherton. “In the interests of public health, Nova Scotia should take the time and make the necessary investments to ensure that proper regulation, management, mitigation and monitoring measures are established.”

Mr. Atherton’s recommendation was welcomed by the Environmental Health Association of Nova Scotia. Barb Harris, the association’s spokeswoman, said that Mr. Atherton acknowledges the presence of some risks associated with fracking, some of which may be very serious.

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The group is lobbying for a 10-year ban on hydraulic fracturing, which it says is enough time for the province to put in place necessary regulations, tracking mechanism and build enforcement capabilities.

Two years ago in 2012, the province’s government passed a 2-year moratorium on fracking, arguing that it required more time to research on the technique. It named a committee of experts to collect public input and draw up recommendations.

Mr. Atherton’s recommendation to go-slow on hydraulic fracturing closely follows the recommendations given by top Canadian scientists in April. The scientists said that there is scanty information available on the effect of fracking in the long run.

Mr. Atherton listed potential risks associated with fracking such as groundwater and air pollution, release of greenhouse gases, surface spills, occupational accidents and surface spills. To register for a free 2-week subscription to ForexMinute Premium Plan, visit www.forexminute.com/newsletter.

To contact the reporter of this story; Jonathan Millet at john@forexminute.com